Here is a tentative look at the APSE Summer Conference at the Nashville Marriott Vanderbilt.

Registration for the conference and hotel reservations at the group rate of $179 are now available.

You may book online (link below). The APSE hotel code is included in this reservation link.

https://aws.passkey.com/e/49389212?utm_source=6143&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=276920138

To Register for the conference, go to:

http://apsportseditors.com/register-for-the-2018-apse-summer-conference-in-nashville/

SUNDAY, June 17

4 p.m. — Combined executive committee/general membership meeting

6 p.m. — Off-site reception at Nashville Predators’ arena

MONDAY, June 18

9-10 a.m.: Spouse/family orientation

9-10:15 am. — Workshop

NASHVILLE SOCIAL HOUR: Former Sports Illustrated and ESPN writer-turned-best selling author Jeff Pearlman has mastered social media in a way that few others have. And you can, too; Jeff will show you how. In his own words: “As a 46-year-old veteran of sports media, I sit right on the line that divides dinosaurs from 21st century dynamos. When I arrived on the scene in 1994, nobody Tweeted, Snapchatted, blogged, Instagramed, shot videos with a camera. The entire job encompassed four words: Report story, write story. But that (obviously) changed — and in order to survive, veterans had to change with it. So I decided to jump in, headfirst. … Thanks to social media, I’ve been able to sustain a career as an author; I’ve been able to track down gazillions of contacts; I’ve built a stronger brand than I ever had at SI or ESPN. In short, it’s made my career.”

9-10:15 a.m. — Workshop

GOOGLE FOR SPORTS: Hosted by Mike Reilley of the Society of Professional Journalists, this session was so popular in New Orleans last year that we’ve brought it back for Nashville 2018. Learn about all of the free Google tools that can help your newsroom build interactive charts, maps, visualizations and more. Tools we’ll cover: Google Trends, MyMaps, Earth Pro and Earth Engine Timelapse. Google also can provide free training in your newsroom. See Mike after the session for details. Required: Laptop and smartphone.

9-10:15 a.m. — Workshop

YOU TELL US: The Sports Journalism Institute trio from Team Tennessee (college students and summer interns Tashan Reed, Michael Curtis and Souichi Terada) take the dais for a conversation with APSE members about their perspective on the state of sports media today. Get ready for a lively and fun exchange of ideas. Editors: These are the sort of smart young people we want to attract and retain as customers, and who will soon be coming to you for journalism jobs. Let’s talk with them. Hosted by incoming second vice president Lisa Wilson of ESPN’s The Undefeated.

10:30-noon — General session

WOMEN OF SPORTS JOURNALISM: This discussion with panelists Lisa Olson, Sarah Spain, Candace Buckner and Diana Nearhos promises to enlighten and challenge. All four women are distinguished sports journalists: Olson is a contributor to The Athletic and a pioneer in the industry who nearly 30 years ago brought a landmark sexual harassment lawsuit against the New England Patriots; Spain hosts a successful ESPN radio show; Buckner covers the Washington Wizards and NBA for The Washington Post; and Nearhos coordinates high school sports coverage for the Knoxville News Sentinel. All are going to share what keeps them motivated and successful in an industry that’s unfortunately still peppered with antiquated thinking and mansplaining fans. Moderated by former APSE president and current APSE executive director Bill Eichenberger, a senior editor at Bleacher Report.

12:15-1:45 — Keynote lunch

Titans’ play-by-play broadcaster Mike Keith and Predators play-by-player broadcaster Pete Weber have been the voices of Nashville professional sports for the past 20 years. They’ve seen the franchises’ first games and their last games … and all of the games in between. During our opening luncheon, the duo will

Keith

tell us how Nashville has become a major professional sports city in a very short time.

2-3:
30 p.m.
 — General session

IS THE ATHLETIC RIGHT?: For years, news organizations small and large gave away their digital content. Today, most of our shops are still trying to find the sweet spot between charging readers for our valuable journalism and charging them too much. Meanwhile, funded by a mountain of venture capital and increasingly stocked with some of the industry’s top talent, The Athletic has gone all-in with targeted premium content. Boston Globe sports editor Joe Sullivan leads a conversation about what matters in a metered paywall world and what we can learn from The Athletic and similar operations. Among this session’s areas of focus: how a subscription environment changes the way sports editors and writers cover and promote their content and where social fits into the equation. Panelists include Paul Fichtenbaum, chief content officer of The Athletic; Ken Rosenthal, senior writer for The Athletic; ESPN senior deputy editor Lauren Reynolds; and Tampa Bay Times sports editor and past APSE president Mike Sherman.

3:45-5 p.m. — Workshop

NASHVILLE SOCIAL HOUR (repeats from morning lineup): Former Sports Illustrated and ESPN writer-turned-best selling author Jeff Pearlman has mastered social media in a way that few others have. And you can, too; Jeff will show you how. In his own words: “As a 46-year-old veteran of sports media, I sit right on the line that divides dinosaurs from 21st century dynamos. When I arrived on the scene in 1994, nobody Tweeted, Snapchatted, blogged, Instagramed, shot videos with a camera. The entire job encompassed four words: Report story, write story. But that (obviously) changed — and in order to survive, veterans had to change with it. So I decided to jump in, headfirst. … Thanks to social media, I’ve been able to sustain a career as an author; I’ve been able to track down gazillions of contacts; I’ve built a stronger brand than I ever had at SI or ESPN. In short, it’s made my career.”

3:45-5 p.m. — Workshop

GOOGLE FOR SPORTS (repeats from morning lineup): Hosted by Mike Reilley of the Society of Professional Journalists, this session was so popular in New Orleans last year that we’ve brought it back for Nashville 2018. Learn about all of the free Google tools that can help your newsroom build interactive charts, maps, visualizations and more. Tools we’ll cover: Google Trends, MyMaps, Earth Pro and Earth Engine Timelapse. Google also can provide free training in your newsroom. See Mike after the session for details. Required: Laptop and smartphone.

3:45-5 p.m. — Workshop

YOU TELL US (repeats from morning lineup): The Sports Journalism Institute trio from Team Tennessee (college students and summer interns Tashan Reed, Michael Curtis and Souichi Terada) take the dais for a conversation with APSE members about their perspective on the state of sports media today. Get ready for a lively and fun exchange of ideas. Editors: These are the sort of smart young people we want to attract and retain as customers, and who will soon be coming to you for journalism  jobs. Let’s talk with them. Hosted by incoming second vice president Lisa Wilson of ESPN’s The Undefeated.

5:15-6:15 — A CONVERSATION WITH AP

As our industry continues to change, so too is our annual session with leadership from the sports operation at The Associated Press. This annual summer conference session, formerly known as the Small Newspaper Caucus, has this year been broadened to be open to all AP members and customers as a forum in which to discuss all aspects of the AP Sports report. Come chat with AP sports editors Howie Rumberg and Oscar Dixon, director of sports products Barry Bedlan and a newcomer to APSE, deputy managing editor Sarah Nordgren, who oversees the organization’s sports, business, entertainment and health/science coverage.

TUESDAY, June 19

9-10 a.m.: Spouse/family orientation

9-10:15 am. — Workshop

 ESPORTS: DAMN RIGHT! In a January tweet, Keith Olbermann equated Esports with “snotty rando kids playing children’s games.” Reponses ranged from “damn right” to “who cares what that analog relic thinks?” Increasingly, Esports is where prominent sports figures and wildly popular video games intersect with huge money on the line. Every one of the major professional sports leagues is positioning itself as a player in a global market that Business Insider estimates will generate $1.5 billion in revenue by 2020. Some perspective: The $11 million prize pool for the 2018 Masters was dwarfed by last year’s $24 million purse for Dota 2, a popular online multiplayer game, and more people watched the League of Legends World Championships (46 million) than the 2016 NBA Finals (30 million). Let that sink in: 46 million people watched other people play video games. This session will get you up to speed on Esports and ways your sports department might capitalize on its enormous traffic and revenue potential.

9-10:15 a.m. — Workshop

INVESTIGATIONS 101: Award-winning NJ Advance Media sports enterprise, projects and investigative reporter Matthew Stanmyre and colleague Steve Politi, a decorated NJ Advance Media sports columnist, share strategies and secrets for pulling off a big-time investigation. Their methodology and tips begin with a mindset. Determination (and probably a FOIA or two) are proven to produce big results.

9-10:15 a.m. — Workshop

WAGERING ON SPORTS BETTING: Fans have been betting on sports since the beginning of, well, sports, but doing so has been legal in only a few pockets of the U.S. A watershed Supreme Court ruling expected before the end of June could make sports betting legal in states other than Nevada. This session will explore how easing such restrictions will likely change how sports are covered, and possibly even alter the running narratives of some major sports. Hosted by Associated Press director of sports products Barry Bedlan, with Las Vegas Review-Journal sports editor Bill Bradley and Sportradar chief commercial officer Steve Byrd.

10:30-noon — General session

READY, SET, GROW!: Want to increase your readership? As in, right now, today? This session will offer practical advice on how to do just that, through such tested devices and methods such as newsletters, regeneration of archived content and close attention to digital metrics. Moderator Gary Potosky, sports editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News and philly.com, and colleague Mark Francescutti, sports vertical director for The Dallas Morning News, will show us how newsletter readers become subscribers, how any shop can turn archived content into fresh traffic, and how digital metrics are more than just page views. We’re all out to grow and retain audience; this 90-minute session will send you home from Nashville with practical tips and proven approaches for maximizing your organization’s potential.

12:15-1:45 — Red Smith Award lunch

Terry Taylor: This year’s Red Smith winner became the first woman sports editor for The Associated Press in 1992, and when she retired in 2014, she was the longest-serving AP sports editor in history. Through the years, she directed AP’s coverage of 14 Olympic Games as well as numerous Super Bowls, World Series, Triple Crown races, Masters, World Cups and college championships. She currently works for the International Olympic Committee as an adviser for the Olympic Information Service.

2-3:30 p.m. — General session

BEAST-MODE STORYTELLING: How do you create dynamic and compelling multimedia features for your website? Using APSE contest-winning entries, we’ll show you how to get it done no matter what size shop you have, and we’ll review some of the best work and best practices from across the nation. The best descriptive storytelling is still steeped in the written word, but next-level presentations also draw upon video, infographics, audio and a host of other digital devices to set the stage and tell the story. Readers today increasingly expect an immersive experience from a narrative, and projects that fall short pay for it in missed page views. Led by moderator Matt Pepin of The Boston Globe, with panelists Chris White of  The Courier Journal in Louisville, Ky., Owen Hassell of the Wilmington StarNews and Maria Torres of The Kansas City Star.

3:45-5 p.m. — Workshop

ESPORTS: DAMN RIGHT! (repeats from morning lineup): In a January tweet, Keith Olbermann equated Esports with “snotty rando kids playing children’s games.” Reponses ranged from “damn right” to “who cares what that analog relic thinks?” Increasingly, Esports is where prominent sports figures and wildly popular video games intersect with huge money on the line. Every one of the major professional sports leagues is positioning itself as a player in a global market that Business Insider estimates will generate $1.5 billion in revenue by 2020. Some perspective: The $11 million prize pool for the 2018 Masters was dwarfed by last year’s $24 million purse for Dota 2, a popular online multiplayer game, and more people watched the League of Legends World Championships (46 million) than the 2016 NBA Finals (30 million). Let that sink in: 46 million people watched other people play video games. This session will get you up to speed on Esports and ways your sports department might capitalize on its enormous traffic and revenue potential.

3:45-5 p.m. — Workshop

INVESTIGATIONS 101 (repeats from morning lineup): Award-winning NJ Advance Media sports enterprise, projects and investigative reporter Matthew Stanmyre and colleague Steve Politi, a decorated NJ Advance Media sports columnist, share strategies and secrets for pulling off a big-time investigation. Their methodology and tips begin with a mindset. Determination (and probably a FOIA or two) are proven to produce big results.

3:45-5 p.m. — Workshop

WAGERING ON SPORTS BETTING (repeats from morning lineup): Hosted by Associated Press director of sports products Barry Bedlan, with Las Vegas Review-Journal sports editor Bill Bradley and Sportradar chief commercial officer Steve Byrd. Fans have been betting on sports since the beginning of, well, sports, but doing so has been legal in only a few pockets of the U.S. A watershed Supreme Court ruling expected before the end of June could make sports betting legal in states other than Nevada. This session will explore how easing such restrictions will likely change how sports are covered, and possibly even alter the running narratives of some major sports.

Evening — Grand Ole Opry

WEDNESDAY, June 20

9-10 a.m.: Spouse/family orientation

9 a.m. — Region caucuses

10 a.m. — Newsmaker session/TBA

11 — Closing executive committee meeting

1:30 — Depart for Jack Daniels distillery tour

6 p.m. — Awards banquet reception

7 p.m. — Awards banquet

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